AWP

We’re looking forward to seeing you at AWP 2020!

AWP graphic for webpage with event listings

Kenyon Review will be at booth #1655. Please plan to drop by for
1) One of our author book-signings with Molly McCully Brown & Susannah Nevison, Adam Clay, Jaquira Díaz, and Caitlin Horrocks (details listed below);
2) Visits with selected guest editors: Jaquira Díaz, Natalie Shapero, and Solmaz Sharif;
3) A glimpse of our brand new Mar/Apr 2020 issue featuring work chosen by guest prose editor Jaquira Díaz;
4) A discount-priced subscription or back issue.

Plus: Don’t miss our legendary bookmark giveaway and enter our raffle for rockin’ KR swag!

Below you’ll find an updated list of panels and readings on which KR Editors, Fellows, and Writers Workshop Instructors are appearing:

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Sponsored by Kenyon Review

10:35 am to 11:50 am
R150. A Tribute to David Baker in his 25th Year as Poetry Editor for Kenyon Review. (T.R. Hummer, Linda Gregerson, Cintia Santana, Meghan O’Rourke, Reginald Dwayne Betts) On the 25th anniversary of his appointment as Poetry Editor of Kenyon Review, and in recognition of his broad contribution to the world of letters, this panel celebrates the writing, teaching, and mentorship of David Baker. A renowned poet and gifted editor, Baker is the author of seventeen books, most recently Swift: New and Selected Poems. These five poets reflect the wide range of aesthetics published in Kenyon Review during Baker’s storied editorial career.
Room 007C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

 

Featuring Dinty W. Moore & Ira Sukrungruang, Writers Workshop Instructors

10:35 am to 11:50 am
R173. Unmasking the Masked Self: The Complex Role of Persona in Memoir. (Daisy Hernandez, Sue William Silverman, Dinty W. Moore, Ira Sukrungruang, Jill Christman) The use of a constructed persona in the essay hails from Montaigne, but persona in memoir is more complicated. If memoirists are telling the honest truth of ourselves, is it ever truthful to hide behind a mask? How can a memoirist be honest and artful at the same time? This panel of award-winning memoirists will explore the intricate braid of voice, style, point-of-view, emotional authenticity, and narrative design to see if we really can tell the truths about ourselves, and if so, how.
Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

 

Featuring Solmaz Sharif, Writers Workshop Instructor

10:35 am to 11:50 am
R168. The Futures of Documentary and Investigative Poetries. (Solmaz Sharif, Erika Meitner, Craig Santos Perez, Tyehimba Jess, Philip Metres) Investigative or documentary poetry situates itself at the nexus between literary production and journalism, where the mythic and factual, the visionary and political, and past and future all meet. From doing recovery projects to performing rituals of healing to inventing forms, panelists will share work (their own and others’) and discuss challenges in docupoetic writing and its futures: the ethics of positionality, appropriation, fictionalizing, collaboration, and political engagement.
Room 217B, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

 

Featuring Hanif Abdurraqib, Writers Workshop Instructor

12:10 pm to 1:25 pm
R205. A Reading & Conversation with Shira Erlichman, Hanif Abdurraqib, and Brenda Shaughnessy, Moderated by Cortney Lamar Charleston, Sponsored by Alice James Books. (Hanif Abdurraqib, Shira Erlichman, Brenda Shaughnessy, Cortney Lamar Charleston) AJB presents three exciting and award-winning writers to share their most recent work. Abdurraqib’s They Don’t Dance No Mo’ is a bracing examination of black performance and race, history, and culture. In Odes to Lithium, Erlichman pens a love letter to lithium, her medication for bipolar disorder. In The Octopus Museum, Shaughnessy expresses fear over survival in a world rife with very real threats: school shootings, climate change, etc. Introduced and moderated by Cortney Lamar Charleston
HemisFair Ballroom C1, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

 

Featuring Ira Sukrungruang, Writers Workshop Instructor

12:10 pm to 1:25 pm
R181. Unsilencing the Undergraduate Workshop. (Lisa Page, Sybil Baker, Ira Sukrungruang, Robin Hemley, Leah Huizar) Undergraduate workshops involve students from diverse backgrounds. Because of this, the traditional workshop model does not always work effectively. As Beth Nguyen states in “Unsilencing the Workshop”: “a system that relies on silencing and skewed power and endurance is a terrible system.” In this panel, experienced teachers will discuss their approaches to teaching undergraduate creative writing, and attendees will leave with practical models and practices to initiate in their classes.
Room 007A, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

 

Guest Editor at KR Booth 1655

1:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Solmaz Sharif, Guest Poetry Editor, will sign copies of Jan/Feb 2020

 

Guest Editor at KR Booth 1655

1:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Natalie Shapero, Guest Poetry Editor, will sign copies of Sept/Oct 2019

 

Booksigning at KR Booth 1655

2:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Molly McCully Brown and Susannah Nevison will be signing their new book In the Field Between Us

 

Featuring David Baker, Poetry Editor and Writers Workshop Instructor

3:20 pm to 4:35 pm
R279. Tribute to Stanley Plumly. (David Baker, Jill Bialosky, Patrick Phillips, Liz Countryman, Hoke Glover) A tribute to Stanley Plumly (1939–2019), one of the most important, admired, and influential teachers of his generation. The author of ten volumes of poetry, including Old Heart, winner of the LA Times Book and Paterson Poetry Prizes, and finalist for the National Book Award, as well as several books of stunning prose, most notably about Keats, Plumly taught and mentored some of the strongest and most significant poets now writing. Five of them read from his work and remark on his legacy.
Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

 

Featuring Kimiko Hahn, Writers Workshop Instructor

3:20 pm to 4:35 pm
R250. The Poetry Chapbook: Entry and Energy. (Jennifer Franklin, Kimiko Hahn, Sean Nevin, Leela Chantrelle, J. Bruce Fuller) What is a chapbook, nonpoets often ask. Five poets and poet-editors discuss unique qualities of the chapbook form and how crafting and publishing a chapbook can help emerging poets and established poets reach an audience or explore a theme. Chapbook editors and authors look at the different paths chapbook poets take postpublication. The chapbook as a gateway to publishing a full-length collection as well as the reasons poets turn to chapbooks throughout their writing lives will be discussed.
Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

 

Featuring Caitlin Horrocks, Writers Workshop Instructor

3:20 pm to 4:35 pm
R255. Time Passes: When Life Is Long and Art Is Short(er). (Joan Silber, Lisa Ko, Derek Palacio, Adrienne Celt, Caitlin Horrocks) Fiction writers are often advised to tackle tales taking place over modest, supposedly manageable amounts of time: days, weeks, months. These panelists all instead wrote stories and books that unspool over years, decades, generations. How do writers keep such a story aloft, sustaining narrative tension and selecting which moments to depict? How do we maintain readers’ belief in and empathy for characters who keep changing, shaped by a lifetime’s worth of half-seen experiences?
Room 008, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

 

Featuring Molly McCully Brown, KR Fellow

5:00 pm to 6:15 pm
R285. Disabled and D/deaf Writers Caucus. (Cade Leebron, Jess Silfa, Molly McCully Brown, Emily Rose Cole) The Disabled and D/deaf Writers Caucus allows for those who are disabled or living with chronic illness, and their allies, to network and discuss common challenges related to identity, writing, and teaching while professionally leading a literary life. By meeting annually at the AWP conference, we aim to archive our interests, challenges, and concerns in order to increase our visibility and emphasize our importance both to this organization and to the communities where we live, teach, and work. Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

 

Friday, March 6, 2020

Featuring Dan Beachy-Quick, Writers Workshop Instructor

10:35 am to 11:50 am
F176B. New Writing from Omnidawn’s Fall 2019 and Spring 2020 books. (David Koehn, Kimberly Reyes, Dan Beachy-Quick, Craig Santos Perez, Jennifer Hasegawa)
The University of Texas at Austin Stage, Exhibit Halls 3-4, Henry B. González Convention Center

 

Booksigning at KR Booth 1655

11:00 am to 11:30 am
Jaquira Díaz, Guest Prose Editor, will be signing her book Ordinary Girls and copies of the Mar/Apr 2020 issue

 

Booksigning at KR Booth 1655

1:30 pm to 2:00 pm
Caitlin Horrocks will be signing her book The Vexations

 

Booksigning at KR Booth 1655

2:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Adam Clay will be signing his book Stranger

 

Featuring Kaveh Akbar, Writers Workshop Instructor

3:20 pm to 4:35 pm
F276. Edit Thyself: Poets Who Are Editors. (William Stobb, Kaveh Akbar, Caryl Pagel, Mark Yakich, Felicia Zamora) The roles of poet and poetry editor are largely complementary—editing engages poets with contemporary developments in the art form, while writing helps an editor understand a poet’s work. Frequently, though, the relationship between these roles is complicated. Beyond the time required to perform each successfully, issues of style and influence play back and forth between the poet editing and the editor composing. Poets who are editors discuss and read from their poetic and editorial work.
Room 301, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

 

Featuring Misha Rai, KR Fellow

3:20 pm to 4:35 pm
F251. Resisting the Exotic: Eradicating Colonial Narratives of Desire. (Nay Saysourinho, Grace Shuyi Liew, Kirin Khan, Audrey T. Williams, Misha Rai) Exoticism, a legacy of colonialism, continues to appear in writing and other forms of media. The concept implies desire and conquest, as exotic people, places, and even animals are foreign enough to be fantasized about, but unthreatening enough to be subjugated. This assumption of passivity harms communities by diminishing their humanity, which allows them to be targets of violence. On this panel, writers will discuss the ways they resist this narrative and how they avoid/subvert exotic tropes.
Room 006D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

 

Saturday, March 7, 2020

Featuring Katherine Hedeen, Translations Editor and Writers Workshop Instructor

9:00am to 10:15 am
S144. Transcreación/Transcreation: Literary Translation and Hemispheric Poetics. (Andrea Cote Botero, Olivia Lott, Rosa Alcalá, Katherine Hedeen) Literary translators have always played crucial roles in facilitating poetic exchange and making possible literary dialogues across spatial, temporal, and linguistic borders. This panel brings together poet-translators of United States and Latin American poetry for a conversation on how our work engages in a hemispheric project. We will discuss the aesthetic, (geo)political, and critical significance of translation as transcreation for inter-American poetries. This panel includes a reading.
Room 303, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level

 

Featuring Kaveh Akbar, Writers Workshop Instructor

10:35 am to 11:50 am
S172. One Hundred Years of Poetry in The Sewanee Review: A Celebration. (Spencer Hupp, Ange Mlinko, Kaveh Akbar, Katy Didden) In 1920, after 28 years of continuous publication, The Sewanee Review first published verse in its pages. Since then it has fostered many of the essential voices in American poetry. Four recent contributors to the magazine will read and analyze poems from the SR archive, as well as their own work, in order to answer the question: what will the next century of poetry look like, in the pages of The Sewanee Review and beyond?
Room 217D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

 

Featuring Angie Cruz, Writers Workshop Instructor

12:10 pm to 1:25 pm
S200. A House of Our Own: A Tribute to Sandra Cisneros. (Stephanie Elizondo Griest, Angie Cruz, Daisy Hernandez, Reyna Grande, Alex Espinoza) Sandra Cisneros is best known as the author of The House on Mango Street and a MacArthur “genius” grantee. Yet a powerful aspect of her legacy began 25 years ago in San Antonio, when she founded the Macondo Writers Workshop by gathering writers around her kitchen table and imploring them to think about their conscience. Five acclaimed Latinx authors who have been deeply influenced by Cisneros in both their art and their activism will pay tribute to their mentor/muse/madrina.
Room 214D, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

 

Featuring Kimiko Hahn, Writers Workshop Instructor

12:10 pm to 1:25 pm
S187. “What I Have Forgotten Is What I Have Written”: A Tribute to Meena Alexander. (Sokunthary Svay, Kimiko Hahn, Lee Briccetti, Kazim Ali, Marilyn Chin) Writers and friends of Meena Alexander remember her work and discuss her influence.
Room 205, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

 

Featuring Geeta Kothari, Nonfiction Editor and Writers Workshop Instructor

12:10 pm to 1:25 pm
S194. Invincibles: Women Writers Publishing After 50. (Naomi J. Williams, Val Brelinski, Peg Alford Pursell, Jimin Han, Geeta Kothari) Many panels and articles claim to honor older women writers—then define “older” as over 35! The fiction writers on this panel all published their first books after age 50. What are the particular challenges—and opportunities—posed by our age and gender? How do we simultaneously manage the demands of writing, publishing—and menopause? In what ways are we constrained—or free? We share true stories, tips, and encouragement for writers of all ages.
Room 211, Henry B. González Convention Center, Meeting Room Level

 

Featuring Shara McCallum, Nonfiction Editor and Writers Workshop Instructor

1:45 pm to 3:00 pm
S214. Essential Contemporary Texts in the Classroom: Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard. (John Hoppenthaler, Honoree Jeffers, Shara McCallum, Michael Waters) Trethewey received the Pulitzer Prize for Native Guard, and those of us who teach it know why: in terms of its content; formal architectures; and historical, cultural, and racial underpinnings, the collection represents a trove of value in the classroom, a collection remarkable for its textured approach to matters of race, identity, historical erasure, memory, and grief. This panel, comprised of poets who regularly teach the book, will provide insight and strategies for teaching it.
Room 006C, Henry B. González Convention Center, Riverlevel

 

Featuring Abigail Wadsworth Serfass, Managing Editor

3:20 pm to 4:35 pm
S275. In It for the Long Haul: Circulation Building for Literary Magazines, Sponsored by CLMP. (David Gibbs, Abigail Serfass, Dani Hedlund, Kellen Braddock) New subscriptions and renewals are key to increasing a magazine’s readership and revenue. Learn innovative strategies for identifying potential readers, building a robust acquisition plan, and converting first-time subscribers into renewals. Room 302, Henry B. González Convention Center, Ballroom Level